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Getting Things Done

Our GTD® podcasts are here to support you at every stage of your GTD practice. You will hear David Allen and others interviewing people from all walks of life about their journey with GTD, from beginners to those who have been at it for years. The podcasts include personal and professional stories, as well as practical tips about GTD systems for desktop and mobile, using apps and paper. Start listening now and you'll be well on your way to stress-free productivity.
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Now displaying: Page 4
Jun 1, 2021

Part 2 of 2 (The complete conversation is available at GTDconnect)

David Allen met with three trainers from our global network, to discuss how GTD can help to reduce burnout. While it has been an issue for years, burnout has been rising steeply since early 2020. The World Health Organization now calls burnout an official medical diagnosis.

It is a result of chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed, and is characterized by three dimensions:

  1. feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion
  2. increased mental distance from one?s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one?s job
  3. reduced professional efficacy

For this discussion, David is joined by Emily Gregory, Morten Rovik, and William Elliott.

Morten shared an infographic on the stress curve. You can click here to download the PDF.

Emily Gregory
VitalSmarts
One Productive Minute

Morten Rovik
produktiveNorge
GTD Nordic podcast (in English)

William Elliott
ActionCo

May 25, 2021

Part 1 of 2

David Allen met with three trainers from our global network, to discuss how GTD can help to reduce burnout. While it has been an issue for years, burnout has been rising steeply since early 2020. The World Health Organization now calls burnout an official medical diagnosis.

It is a result of chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed, and is characterized by three dimensions:

  1. feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion
  2. increased mental distance from one?s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one?s job
  3. reduced professional efficacy

For this discussion, David is joined by Emily Gregory, Morten Rovik, and William Elliott.

Morten shared an infographic on the stress curve. You can click here to download the PDF.

Emily Gregory
VitalSmarts
One Productive Minute

Morten Rovik
produktiveNorge
GTD Nordic podcast (in English)

William Elliott
ActionCo

May 19, 2021

From the archives: David talks about the challenge of procrastination and the reasons why we do it. He also explains the difference between procrastination and intuitive holding.

May 12, 2021

From the Archives: David talks about organizing project actions and explains that when we're thinking about a theme, topic, project, problem, situation, we tend to want to see everything about that all together...

May 7, 2021

From the archives: David steps out of his comfort zone to talk about his story and what excites him. 

Apr 30, 2021

From the Archives: David talks with Richard Rierson on the Dose of Leadership podcast about GTD®

Apr 20, 2021

From the Archives: David explains that there is no perfect tool, it doesn't matter. It does matter that you have a tool or some tools, and not rely on our psyches. You need a tool that matches the function.

Apr 13, 2021

From the archives: Coach Meg Edwards talks about how to get to a complete project list if you're like most people who hover at 30%-80% complete project lists, and how to get them to 100% complete.

Apr 7, 2021

GTD Coach, Meg Edwards, expands on what she sees as problems with people's incomplete Project Lists with a personal example.

Mar 31, 2021

From the archives: Les McKeown talks to David Allen about GTD for his Predictable Success podcast.

Mar 23, 2021

From the archives: History, So It Doesn't Repeat, interviews David Allen. They explore personal productivity and how to clear our mental RAM. You'll discover how to Get Things Done® and learn how to make informed choices with ease, by learning a few keystone habits, you'll be primed to be productive and create a stress free environment. Learning is the answer, what is the question?

Mar 16, 2021

From the archives: David talks about all the keys to filing and how it relates to GTD® and how it creates "clean edges".

Mar 11, 2021

From the archives: David talks about having a window into the professional world for kids before they enter into the working life.

Mar 2, 2021

From the Archives: David Allen on setting Goals for 2010 with Christy Nicholson of Scientific American. Advice you can use for any new year.

Feb 23, 2021

Please enjoy a segment from a webinar David Allen did for our GTD Connect members. It’s a guided mind sweep. It’s a really great opportunity to experience what you’ll find at GTDconnect.com and also be able to walk yourself through this really important practice with your GTD implementation.

Subscribe on iTunes or wherever else you find your podcasts. Or simply head over to:

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#GTD #gettingthingsdone #DavidAllen #GTDpartner #GTDofficial #mindlikewater #FreedomFocusGTD #WeeklyReview #somedaymaybe

 

Feb 19, 2021

David talks about the value of the GTD Weekly Review®

Feb 17, 2021

GTD Coach, Meg Edwards, talks about how you can customize your lists and tells you how she sets up her action lists. Find what works for you.

Jun 26, 2020

In this episode, Meg Edwards shares how she performs an outdoor Mind Sweep.  She models for us how a Mind Sweep can be done anywhere, and how this process can be used to bring additional items to mind when you're in a given context.

If you'd like to hear more about the Mind Sweep and how it can serve you in capturing more items to gain control, listen to episode 3 where David Allen guides you through a full Mind Sweep.

Jun 3, 2020

In this episode we present an excerpt from a talk that David gave in front of a live audience. It covers procrastination, what type of people are the most susceptible to getting stuck, and how to stop procrastinating on your taxes….and everything else.

May 30, 2020

A bit of a repeat if you've listened to my other tips, but one I just wanted to reinforce. Outcome and Action Thinking.

Outcome and action are the two core elements of productivity. What do I want to produce or experience? And how do I need to allocate or reallocate my resources to make it happen? So that kind of thinking, as simple as that sounds, is something that we need to train ourselves to do. It's really a cognitive muscle you need to work with. So anything that's got your attention, anything that's either worrying or bothering you. That's the time to practice this sort of cognitive muscle. To use it.

What would you like to have true? Instead of whatever is currently true. And how do you need to reallocate, or allocate your attention, your activities, your resources, to make that happen?

For those of you asking "What's that huge pile of books back there David?" Frankly, the outcome was, I had a bunch of archives of all of the translated versions of my book in the different languages that we were going to throw away when we moved to Amsterdam. We said, nah we should probably keep at least one copy of each, but we live in an apartment. So, a small space. Outcome... How do you do that? That's a great bookshelf you can get from a company called Design Within Reach in the U.S. that actually works, where you can stack all those things up and they don't fall over. Anyway, so that's what that is.

So, outcome and action thinking. I just challenge you, invite you, to apply that somewhere that you might be not thinking you ought to apply that, or that you haven't done that yet. So, what's the outcome you're after? What's the action step you need to take to move toward it?

In many many cases now, that's become something that's just habit in my life given what I teach and what I've explored over all these years about how to keep your head clear. So hopefully this will be just a reminder for those of you already familiar with that idea. To apply it wherever you need to apply it now.

May 30, 2020

You know this is another one of those kind of out of the box things but this could be a really good time to do some reflection on new stuff. New relationships. New ways to manage your relationships. New ways of managing yourself. Being able to work more independently, even if you're still part of an organization, and need to be connected to it.

We grow with challenges, so the challenges that we may all be in right now or experiencing in some way, shape, or form they're going to teach a strength, patience, and tolerance I've discovered after my 75 years. That tends to show up and expand, and kind of add to the quality of my life. Add to the relaxation of my life. Add to the focus of my life.

One very useful key many times, is journaling. If you're not doing that already you might want to consider just sitting down and just writing. Just writing out. I've done journaling on both my computer as well as with a great fountain pen and a wonderful journal, over the years in my life.

There have been times that was really really helpful. Just to help kind of uncork, unload and open up some creative thinking that could go on when you're in times that sort of force some reflection where reflection could be highly useful to you. So, be crazy about what could be cool in your life, in lots of different ways. Be open to all the options for that.

May 30, 2020

Upgrade, you know if you have any downtime at all, with that kind of backed off time that we have, in the pandemic. It's the situation we're dealing with right now.

This is a time to think, it's part of one of those backlog things, one of those things you may have had in the back of your mind. I need to upgrade my computer. I need to upgrade my operating system. I need to upgrade this piece of software. I need to upgrade any of my technology, and any of my tools.

If you're painting, do you have the right brushes? Do you need to upgrade those? If you're playing the flute, or the piano, do you need to upgrade any of the music that you have to be able to practice with?

So I know this is kind of an off-the-wall question. But, a good idea to sort of access, is there anything that you might want to bring up to current speed? That you enjoy, that you love, or you need to be involved with.

I love Kevin Kelly's book from a few years ago, talking about the inevitable, talking about the inevitable trends that are happening to all of us, no matter what. He basically made the point that, you're never going to get really any good at anything because there are going to be constant upgrades, especially in software. So, I used to think that I could just resist upgrades to my Quicken because I thought I could manage it, but now I can't afford to do that because, who knows, to be able to manage Quicken and my accounting stuff personally I need to have the current version.

So it's kind of like, trust that you're never going to get truly on board with everything, currently and totally, but some of those things might need to be upgraded, and that could be just a process. You kind of get the zen of that. OK, let me just keep upgrading, getting better at, getting more stuff that might work. So, just in case that triggers any kind of a thought. Any kind of a thing you might want to add to your list. Hopefully that's helpful.

May 28, 2020

How much money do you actually have in your bank account? How do you and the people in your family really feel right now? Really.  What's really going on in your professional environment? In your personal environment?

Not generalizing or exaggerating. Most people have a tendency, me too, to generalize. Everybody's leaving. It's so awful. Everybody's leaving the company, what do you mean? Everybody's leaving. It's so awful. Everybody's leaving the company? What do you mean? Well, Sally said she thought she might want to get a new career. And over 35 years of my consulting and coaching practices, I've often seen, And over 35 years of my consulting and coaching practices, I've often seen, all I have to do is to start to address, what is the real current reality?  

And there are lots of ways to do that, but I would highly recommend you examine whether you're running any exaggerations or generalizations. That may be creating more pressure than you need. What's really true? What do you know what's really true? What do you know is actually really true?

Not "What do you think is true?", or "What do people say is true?"  But, what do you *know* it actually really true? It gives you a grounded base to actually make decisions from.

I could spin on that for a long time, but let me just say if that rings any of your bells at all, notice whether you're generalizing and exaggerating. And if so, stop it!

Just say what's really true right now? Because you need to know what's the current reality so that you can then move from a ground base of reality. Not from some expectation of that, or generalization of that, or exaggeration of that.

May 28, 2020

I'll steal a play from Marie Kondo's work that she's been doing, by getting people to clean up closets and clean up their environment. And only keep the things you love and that turn you on.

Mine's a little more universal. Look, there's a lot of things that don't turn you on that you still need to keep. There's a lot of things that you need to kind of look at and say, yeah I'm not sure whether I want to throw that away or not. That's fine. But it's not a bad idea, especially in times like these, if you have any kind of extra time at all, to, as I say, bring up the rear guard.

I've mentioned this in several of my other two-minute tips, but this is sort of the universal clean up. Clean up your computer. Clean up your closets. Clean up the boot or the trunk of your car. Your garage, your attic, any spaces that you have. Any rented spaces that you have, to hold old stuff.

The world is just so addicted to hanging onto a lot of stuff, as opposed to being clean and clear. So I highly recommend you look around. What books need to be given away? What clothes need to be given away? What shoes have you not worn for two years? Where can you give those things away that people might be able to use that?

So look around your environment and say, how functional is it? How useful is it? How current is it in terms of the reality of these things and their meaning to you? And that's fine. There's no right or wrong in terms of whatever that volume is. It may be whatever it is that you want, how ever much you feel comfortable. But most people feel slightly uncomfortable about what's still in their closet, what's still in the drawers of their desk, what's still anywhere. So now's a good time, when I say "When in doubt, clean a drawer", it'll help a ton.

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